SMART’S Digital Living Lab embracing the IoT revolution

Mr Tim Davies1, Ms Tania  Brown1

1Smart Infrastructure Facility, University Of Wollongong,  Wollongong, Australia, tdavies@uow.edu.autaniabr@uow.edu.au

 

The SMART Infrastructure Facility, with the backing of the University of Wollongong, has embarked on a mission to become a technologically powered hub with the potential to improve the lives of every person in the community.

The establishment of SMART’s Digital Living Lab will see the region become home to a free-to-air Internet of Things (IoT) network, that enables us to fully embrace the IoT revolution. Designed to address key social and environmental challenges within the region, it will ultimately allow individuals, community groups and businesses the ability to connect like never before.

Over the next months and years, we believe this will lead to us truly becoming a smart city which will use broad-ranging, research-oriented projects to improve the ‘liveability’ of the city and the lifestyle of the people within it.

In collaboration with Wollongong City Council and Sydney Water, UOW is deploying a free-to-air Internet of Things (IoT) network across the region to support high impact community-orientated projects.

The Internet of Things (IoT) enables a cost effective mechanism to collect data from thousands of small digital devices (nodes) that inform real time applications. Current examples include smart home thermostats, smart street lighting or smart street parking finders.

IoT comes in many ways and forms. The LoRaWAN technology offers an open protocol and free-to-air connection to application developers and end-users. UOW is partnering with Meshed and The Things Network to deploy this network in the Illawarra region, allowing for cost effective community-orientated solutions.

The Digital Living Lab will connect individuals, community groups and businesses, helping them develop technology-based, research-oriented projects to improve the liveability of the city and the lifestyle of the people within it.

One of the first projects will use sensors to monitor the Wollongong city’s storm water network. The city’s topography bounded by an escarpment on one side and the ocean on the other, makes it especially vulnerable to catastrophic floods. Wollongong is a network of small streams that come off the escarpment very quickly, there is a real need to better understand how floods work and how streams rise and fall in various rainfall events. This is a great opportunity to collect a lot of data, and therefore further refine flood models, and allow people to be more confident about the flood impacts on their property.

Other projects will be developed to map the availability of wheelchair access to pivotal venues; monitor water flow in primary lagoons, benefit aged care homes; test air quality or develop improved transport options.

The Internet of Things network is designed for community use and this initiative is all about people working together to create a region that reflect the needs and desires of the people at its heart. The possibilities are endless.

The development of the Wollongong region as a Digital Living Lab would place it on the cutting-edge of a global revolution, allowing it to become Australia’s most dynamic and forward-thinking hub.


Biography:

Tim Davies works for the SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong. He specialises in data visualisation and design.

Parks Australia Collaborations across e-Research systems: Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) project

Dr Belinda  Brown1, Dr Andrew Bissett2, Professor Andrew Young3, Dr Anna Fitzgerald4, Dr Andrew Gilbert4

1Parks Australia, Canberra, Australia, Belinda.Brown@environment.gov.au

2CSIRO, Hobart, Australia, Andrew.Bissett@csiro.au

3National Research Collections Australia, CSIRO, Canberra, Australia, Andrew.Young@csiro.au

4 Bioplatforms Australia Ltd, Sydney, Australia, afitzgerald@bioplatforms.com agilbert@bioplatforms.com 

 

Environmental information is a strategic asset of Parks Australia and is at the heart of management decisions. The way in which information is collected, described, managed, stored and used is critical to business needs.

The Knowledge Management Strategy for Parks Australia Environmental Information supports information management objectives, now and into the future, to help build the knowledge needed to protect and conserve Australia’s biodiversity, as well as engage with stakeholders and national research infrastructure partners.

Parks Australia contributes environmental information to national and international networks, including, amongst others: the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA), Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).

The agency also contributes to strategic partnerships and projects. The Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) Project is a recent example with partners from CSIRO and Bioplatforms Australia, with contributions to a national e-Research database. The project collaboration marshalled complementary partners around Australia to pool time and resources to collect under a national sampling framework, including Parks Australia reserves. The project was an opportunity to develop a national environmental and soil microbial diversity framework, to enable new continental baseline information on soil microbial communities, which are primary drivers of soil ecological processes such as nutrient and carbon cycling.

BASE was developed in an open data framework, and is the first Australian soil microbial diversity database. BASE links environmental and soil data across bio-geographic regions, including Commonwealth reserves. Its database provides a reference for comparative analysis across different datasets and regions. The database provides a platform to grow and evolve over time.  It provides a basis to link with other databases and tools, and national e-research infrastructure networks, such as those at the Atlas of Living Australia and Bioplatforms Australia. It provides a new baseline for investigations into the largely un-quantified role of soil microbial diversity in broad scale patterns of plant species abundance, and ecosystem resilience.

Partnerships, and collaboration models such as this provide a basis to value add multi-disciplinary data and enabling science. Information sharing and collaborative practice will continue to expand and change with more organisations working together for multi-disciplinary and integrated outcomes. Now, with emerging policy initiatives across the public sector for data integration, sharing and re-use; national infrastructure and e-Research collaborations continue to be an important component to help build high-value datasets for targeted science, services, policies and programs.


Biography:

Belinda works across multidisciplinary areas for science, environment, and information management;  drawing on over 15 years of experience in the research and public sectors.

Belinda has a PhD in earth systems sciences, and started her career as a research scientist working on a range of international  projects into the development of southern ocean seaways and palaeo-climate around Antarctica.  This laid the foundations for her work in the science-data-policy interface; including amongst other things, working with the National Biodiscovery Working Group, the COAG National Science Working Group for Climate Change Adaptation, COAG Solar Thermal Technology Roadmap Committee, the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation.

Belinda is also lead author and manager for the Knowledge Management Strategy for Parks Australia Environmental Information, and its implementation. Belinda has an interest in enabling evidence based information for improved social, economic, and environmental outcomes; and works with colleagues to extend the value of public data, including Linked Data and eResearch. Recent projects include the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) Project, a National Threatened Species Project, and a National Environmental Science Program Emerging Priorities project for the digital curation of long term monitoring datasets.

Digital Earth Australia (DEA): From Satellites to Services

Evans, N1, Dhu, T.2, Gavin, D.3, Hudson, D.4, Kershaw, T.5, Lymburner, L.6, Metlenko, A.7, Mueller, N.8, Oliver, S.9, Penning, C.10, Thankappan, M.11,Thomson, A.12

1Geoscience Australia, Canberra, AUS

Neal.Evans@ga.gov.au Trevor.Dhu@ga.gov.au Daivd.Gavin@ga.gov.au David.Hudson@ga.gov.au Trent.Kershaw@ga.gov.au Leo.Lymburner@ga.gov.au Alla.Metlenko@ga.gov.au , Norman.Mueller@ga.gov.au Simon.Oliver@ga.gov.au Chris.Penning@ga.gov.au Medhavy.Thankappan@ga.gov.au Alicia.Thomson@ga.gov.au

INTRODUCTION

The 2017/18 Budget identified over $2 billion of investments in monitoring, protecting or enhancing Australia’s land, coasts and oceans over the next four years including: the National Landcare Program; the Commonwealth Marine Reserves implementation; implementation of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan and water reform agenda; support for State and Territory governments to develop secure and affordable water infrastructure; improving water quality and scientific knowledge of the Great Barrier Reef.

Geoscience Australia’s efforts within this investment will be a program known as Digital Earth Australia (DEA) and will directly support these investments through the provision of an evidence base for the design, implementation and evaluation of policies, programs and regulation. It will also support Industry with access to stable, standardised data and imagery products from which it can innovate to produce new value added products and services.

WHAT IS DEA?

DEA is an analysis platform for satellite imagery and other Earth observations. Today, it translates 30 years of Earth observation data (taken every two weeks at 25 metre squared resolution) and tracks changes across Australia in unprecedented detail, identifying soil and coastal erosion, crop growth, water quality, and changes to cities and regions. When fully operational, DEA will provide new information for every 10 square metres of Australia, every five days.

DEA uses open source standards, building off the international Open Data Cube technology which is supported by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Initial examples of how DEA will support government, industry and the research community through improved data include Water Observations from Space (WOfS), a continent-scale map of the presence of surface water; and the Intertidal Extents Model (ITEM) that consistently maps Australia’s vast intertidal zone to support coastal planning.

WOfS is already helping to improve the Australian Government’s understanding of water availability, historical flood inundation and environmental flows, while ITEM has yielded the first continent-wide tidal extent map for Australia and is being used by the Queensland government to assist in their intertidal and subtidal habitat mapping program.

BENEFITS TO GOVERNMENT

DEA will benefit government departments and agencies that need accurate and timely spatial information on the health and productivity of Australia’s landscape. This near real-time information can be readily used as an evidence base for the design, implementation, and evaluation of policies, programs and regulation, and for developing policy advice.
DEA will also support agencies to better monitor change, protect and enhance Australia’s natural resources, and enable more effective responses to problems of national significance. Information extracted from Earth observation data will reduce risk from natural hazards such as bushfires and floods, assist in securing food resources, and enable informed decision making across government. Economic benefits are expected to be realised from better targeted government investment, reduced burden on the recipients of government funding, and increased productivity.
The DEA Program is developing joint projects to deliver products that address policy challenges across a range of Australian Government departments.

JOIN US

We invite you to be part of the future of DEA, as we build new products and tools to support Australian Government agencies to better monitor, protect, and enhance Australia’s natural resources.
Contact us to discuss how DEA can inform and support the work of your agency.
W: www.ga.gov.au/dea
E: Earth.Observation@ga.gov.au

REFERENCES

  1. Lewis, A., Oliver, S., Lymburner, L., Evans, B., Wyborn, L., Mueller, N., Raevksi, G., Hooke, J., Woodcock, R., Sixsmith, J., Wu, W., Tan, P., Li, F., Killough, B., Minchin, S., Roberts, D., Ayers, D., Bala, B., Dwyer, J., Dekker, A., Dhu, T., Hicks, A., Ip, A., Purss, M., Richards, C., Sagar, S., Trenham, C., Wang, P., L-W Wang, L-W., The Australian Geoscience Data Cube – Foundations and lessons learned, Remote Sensing of Environment (In Press). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2017.03.015
  2. Available from http://www.ceosdatacube.org, accessed 28 Aug 2017
  3. Mueller, N., Lewis, A., Roberts, D., Ring, S., Melrose, R., Sixsmith, J., Lymburner, L., McIntyre, A., Tan, P., Curnow, S., Ip, A. Water observations from space: Mapping surface water from 25 years of Landsat imagery across Australia, Remote Sensing of Environment 174, 341-352, ISSN 0034-4257.
  4. Sagar, S., Roberts, D., Bala, B., Lymburner, L., 2017. Extracting the intertidal extent and topography of the Australian coastline from a 28 year time series of Landsat observations.Remote Sensing of Environment 195, 153–169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2017.04.009
  5. GA eCat Record http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/113041, created 28 Aug 2017

 

Biography:

Neal Evans holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Geology and following 10 years working for a multi-national exploration company CRA Exploration (now known as Rio Tinto), has worked for 20 years within the Australian Public Service, much of this with Geoscience Australia and its predecessors.

Neal’s roles have included Information Geologist, Database Developer, Mineral Commodity Specialist, Database & Application Team Leader, Project Manager, Director of Information Services and Divisional Information Officer, perhaps best summarised as a Data Scientist.

SMART’S Digital Living Lab embracing the IoT revolution

Mr Tim Davies1, Ms Tania  Brown

1Smart Infrastructure Facility, University Of Wollongong,  Wollongong, Australia tdavies@uow.edu.au taniabr@uow.edu.au

The SMART Infrastructure Facility, with the backing of the University of Wollongong, has embarked on a mission to become a technologically powered hub with the potential to improve the lives of every person in the community.

The establishment of SMART’s Digital Living Lab will see the region become home to a free-to-air Internet of Things (IoT) network, that enables us to fully embrace the IoT revolution. Designed to address key social and environmental challenges within the region, it will ultimately allow individuals, community groups and businesses the ability to connect like never before.
Over the next months and years, we believe this will lead to us truly becoming a smart city which will use broad-ranging, research-oriented projects to improve the ‘liveability’ of the city and the lifestyle of the people within it.

In collaboration with Wollongong City Council and Sydney Water, UOW is deploying a free-to-air Internet of Things (IoT) network across the region to support high impact community-orientated projects.

The Internet of Things (IoT) enables a cost effective mechanism to collect data from thousands of small digital devices (nodes) that inform real time applications. Current examples include smart home thermostats, smart street lighting or smart street parking finders.

IoT comes in many ways and forms. The LoRaWAN technology offers an open protocol and free-to-air connection to application developers and end-users. UOW is partnering with Meshed and The Things Network to deploy this network in the Illawarra region, allowing for cost effective community-orientated solutions.

The Digital Living Lab will connect individuals, community groups and businesses, helping them develop technology-based, research-oriented projects to improve the liveability of the city and the lifestyle of the people within it.

One of the first projects will use sensors to monitor the Wollongong city’s storm water network. The city’s topography bounded by an escarpment on one side and the ocean on the other, makes it especially vulnerable to catastrophic floods. Wollongong is a network of small streams that come off the escarpment very quickly, there is a real need to better understand how floods work and how streams rise and fall in various rainfall events. This is a great opportunity to collect a lot of data, and therefore further refine flood models, and allow people to be more confident about the flood impacts on their property.

Other projects will be developed to map the availability of wheelchair access to pivotal venues; monitor water flow in primary lagoons, benefit aged care homes; test air quality or develop improved transport options.

The Internet of Things network is designed for community use and this initiative is all about people working together to create a region that reflect the needs and desires of the people at its heart. The possibilities are endless.

The development of the Wollongong region as a Digital Living Lab would place it on the cutting-edge of a global revolution, allowing it to become Australia’s most dynamic and forward-thinking hub.


Biography:

Tim Davies works for the SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong. He specialises in data visualisation and design.

International Workshop on Science Gateways – Australia

Michelle Barker1, Steve Androulakis2, David Abramson3, Sandra Gesing4, Rebecca Pirzl5, Richard Sinnott6, Nancy Wilkins-Diehr7

1NeCTAR, Parkville, Australia, michelle.barker@nectar.org.au

2ANDS, NeCTAR, RDS, Parkville, Australia, steve.androulakis@nectar.org.au

3University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia, david.abramson@uq.edu.au

4University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA, sandra.gesing@nd.edu

5ALA, Canberra, rebecca.pirzl@csiro.au

6University of Melbourne, Parkville, rsinnott@unimelb.edu.au

7San Diego Supercomputing Centre, La Jolla, USA, wilkinsn@sdsc.edu

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Workshop Length: Two Days

Primary Presenter: Various, including Dan Katz as keynote, submitted talk and discussions.

Workshop Format: Invited speakers, Open Call for Proposals (Lightning talks, demonstrations), World Cafe.

 

 

DESCRIPTION

This two day workshop offers participants the opportunity to engage with other members of the Science Gateways community, to explore common issues and share successes.

A Science Gateway is a community-developed set of tools, applications, and data collections that are integrated through a tailored web-based environment. Often Science Gateways leverage larger scale computing and data storage facilities that would otherwise be inaccessible to many domain scientists. Gateways can be used to tackle common scientific goals, engage with industry, and offer resources for educating students and informing non-experts.

To continue the development of this community, this workshop offers a venue for knowledge exchange and skills development. Australian science gateways evidence many valuable impacts for their research communities, including collaboration with international gateways in their field. The significance of science gateways programs is evidenced in the existence of a range of national/regional programs that facilitate development of science gateways.

The submission closing date for IWSG-A is 30 June 2017. All submissions will be double-blind peer reviewed and evaluated on quality and relevance.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Data Analysts

Data Managers

Government Representatives

HPC Managers & Specialists

IT Managers & Directors

Librarians

Programmers

Professionals in associated disciplines

Project Managers

Researchers

Research Computing Specialists

Research Managers

Scientists

Software & App engineers

University Representatives

WHAT TO BRING

Attendees don’t need to bring computers.

DELIVERY

Call for Papers finishes 30 June 2017. Instructions for making a submission can be found on the IWSG-A web site: http://iwsg-life.org/site/iwsglife/about-iwsg-a

COST:  This workshop isn’t subsidised. Full conference workshop fees apply.


Biography

Michelle Barker is Deputy Director (Research Software Infrastructure) at National eResearch Collaborative Tools and Resources (Nectar), a National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) funded program. She is one of the convenors of the annual International Workshop on Science Gateways ­ Australia, and the International Coalition on Science Gateways. As Deputy Director at Nectar, Michelle directs the virtual laboratory program, which has facilitated the development of twelve virtual laboratories in diverse disciplines, with over 10,000 users. In this role she also facilitates national conversations around common challenges such as research reproducibility, software sustainability and impact metrics. She was previously Program Director of a science gateway for the malaria community, based at James Cook University. Follow her on Twitter as @michelle1barker

Recent Comments

    About the conference

    eResearch Australasia provides opportunities for delegates to engage, connect, and share their ideas and exemplars concerning new information centric research capabilities, and how information and communication technologies help researchers to collaborate, collect, manage, share, process, analyse, store, find, understand and re-use information.

    Conference Managers

    Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the conference.

    © 2018 - 2019 Conference Design Pty Ltd